Feeling Isolated?

  • Written by Zero Hedge
  • Published in Economics

Authored by Adam Taggart via PeakProsperity.com,

  • Does anyone else in your life share your concerns for the future?

  • Is there someone you talk with regularly about the unsustainability of our current economic and ecological trajectories?

  • Do you have friends and/or family members who support your efforts to develop a more resilient lifestyle?

If you answered "no" to these questions, you're not an outlier. In fact, the #1 most commonly-reported complaint we hear from Peak Prosperity readers is that they feel alone and isolated when it comes to the warnings delivered in The Crash Course.

The end of economic growth. Declining net energy. Accelerating resource depletion. These are MASSIVE existential threats to our way of life -- to our species' survival, even. Most PPers can't comprehend why *everyone* isn't obessively talking about these dangers.

But very few people are. Truthfully, most don't want to; for a wide variety of reasons.

So that leaves us, the conscientious critical thinkers, alone by ourselves to worry and plan.

Does this sound like you? If so, read on...

Wired For Connection

Humans are biologically wired for social connection.

Until just recently, historically-speaking, humans typically existed in small tribal groups of 30-60 people, where the degree of unity and cohesiveness of the group directly determined its odds of survival. Facing constant adversity from the weather, predators, other tribes, etc -- every member of the group had a role and a duty to perform. 

We've delved into this topic deeply in the past, particularly in our podcast with Peabody Award-winning author Sebastian Junger.

In his book Tribe, Junger observes how far modern life is from the conditions our distant ancestors evolved from. We are so dis-connected from each other now that the lack of community is manifesting in alarming ways in today's society.

Junger focuses on the challenges that soldiers, Peace Corps volunteers, war refugees, and others who have similarly banded together under adverse conditions -- as our distant ancestors did -- face when re-integrating into peaceful, civilian life. Depression, addiction and suicide are all-too common responses as they struggle to find meaning in their daily lives, which now feel unfulfillingly superficial and lonesome compared to the "real-ness" and "alive-ness" they'd experienced before.

Despite the often-horrible conditions they were subject to, many guiltily admit to Junger that they preferred life under duress -- facing threats like bullets, disease, or cancer. What does that reflect about quality of life in our current society?

In the case of US veterans, they're committing suicide at the rate of over 20 deaths per day -- nearly one every hour. And they're dying of opioid drug overdoses at twice the rate of the civilian population. While there are many reasons behind this, Junger is convinced from his research that "leaving the tribal...

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